San Fermin: Running of the Bulls in New Orleans The run starts/ends in front of Ernst Café, 600 S. Peters St. Runners will take to the streets pursued by “the bulls,” members of the Big Easy Rollergirls wielding plastic bats, an homage to the famous running of the bulls in Pamplona, Spain, 8 a.m. Anyone may participate. Runners must wear a white shirt, white pants or shorts, and have a red scarf tied around their waist and necks. Ernst Café will be serving wine and food with music by Vivaz! before and after the run. An evening party, “La Fiesta de Pantalones” (The Pants Party), begins at 8 p.m. at 12 Bar on Fulton with Spanish food, and music by Los Po-Boy-Citos and Dr. Gumbo’s Spanish Soundsystem. Admission: Race participation is free. $5 for evening party

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San Fermin: Running of the Bulls in New Orleans The run starts/ends in front of Ernst Café, 600 S. Peters St. Runners will take to the streets pursued by “the bulls,” members of the Big Easy Rollergirls wielding plastic bats, an homage to the famous running of the bulls in Pamplona, Spain, 8 a.m. Anyone may participate. Runners must wear a white shirt, white pants or shorts, and have a red scarf tied around their waist and necks. Ernst Café will be serving wine and food with music by Vivaz! before and after the run. An evening party, “La Fiesta de Pantalones” (The Pants Party), begins at 8 p.m. at 12 Bar on Fulton with Spanish food, and music by Los Po-Boy-Citos and Dr. Gumbo’s Spanish Soundsystem. Admission: Race participation is free. $5 for evening party

Patrick Van Hoorebeek finally opened Patrick’s Bar Vin, his long-awaited wine bar in the French Quarter’s St. Louis Hotel.As the name implies, Patrick’s Bar Vin is winecentric, with temperature-controlled wine lockers available for rent. There also is a small plates menu overseen by Agnes Bellet, a longtime chef with the St. Louis.
Patrick’s Bar Vin is at 730 Bienville St., 504.453.3026.

The word “joint” has multiple meanings. Cowbell brings to mind three of them.

There is joint as in a cocked elbow, which is what the Mississippi River looks like on the map not far from where Cowbell resides in the Riverbend. There is also the illicit joint, whose consumption one imagines could influence a diner’s reaction to the shabby fun house décor of Cowbell’s dining room, where the sign for the men’s bathroom reads “Meat and Potatoes” and the women’s “Dairy and Eggs.”
Judging by the evidence at Cowbell, Brack May, the chef who opened the restaurant earlier this year with his wife, Krista Pendergraft-May, has patronized more than his fair share of joints through the years. You can tell by how at home he appears strolling through the place in a tie-dyed T-shirt, lugging a jug of watermelon margaritas out of the kitchen or carrying a cutting board of seasoned rib-eyes into it. His demeanor is less like that of a business owner than of a buddy who decided to throw a barbecue to celebrate having just won a box of Omaha Steaks in a raffle.
Hamburgers are the calling card at Cowbell; if the restaurant stands to live or die by them, it should be around for a while. Every element of the most basic burger available stands up to close inspection: a flavor-rich beef patty of rational thickness that surrenders juice on impact; salad-ready lettuce, tomato and onion that add color, texture and counter-balancing temperature; a toasted potato roll that’s soft to the touch but tough enough for the job.

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